Oregon Unemployment Calculator

Calculate your projected benefit by filling quarterly wages earned below:

We created this calculator to aid you evaluate what you might obtain if you are entitled. We make no promises that the sum you receive will be equal to what the calculator illustrates.


State Name: Oregon

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Disclaimer: The estimates are good in faith and accuracy is not guaranteed. We are not liable for any loss and damages caused by using the tools on our website.

Recent Questions

Will previous unemployment debt be garnished from a new claim?
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Can I apply for benefits based on work from 1996-2004? I worked full time, year round
Moving from IL to OR

To apply for Oregon unemployment benefits click here

The most recent figures for Oregon show an unemployment rate of 6.9%.

Non-Monetary Eligibility Requirements

You can collect benefits if you meet a series of legal eligibility requirements:

  • Have earned qualifying wages
  • Are unemployed through no fault of their own,
  • Are able and obtainable to work full-time and
  • Are keenly looking for full-time work

In addition to having adequate earnings, you must meet other eligibility benefits to be entitled for UI benefits. Some instances of issues that may influence eligibility for UI benefits comprise:

  • Reason for job separation
  • Proper weekly claim filing
  • School attendance
  • Self employment or corporate offices
  • Strike or labor disputes
  • Denial of a job offer
  • Alien status
  • School employee
  • Illness or injury
  • Professional athlete

More details on UI eligibility can be found in the unemployment eligibility article.

Monetary Eligibility Requirements

Qualifying Wages:

You must have worked at least two calendar quarters of your Base period, and have enough wages. Under the present Law, you may be eligible monetarily if you were paid wages in covered employment of at least $858.00 in the calendar quarter of your period in which your wages were the maximum and your total base period wages were no less than one and a half times the wages paid in that highest quarter.

For more information on Base Period and monetary determination refer unemployment eligibility article.

How long will I receive benefits:

Usually, most states permit an individual to obtain unemployment for a maximum of 26 weeks, or half the benefit the benefit year. A few states have standardized benefit duration, while most have different durations depending upon the worker. In a state with varied duration, it is probable that the benefit year may include less than 26 payable weeks.

The calculation is normally which us smaller: 26xWBA or 1/3 BPW. WBA is the Weekly Benefit Amount, so 26xWBA would be the regular week program. 1/3 BPW refers to the Base Period Wages, so if a person did not succeed to earn more than 3 times the standard benefit amount, they will be suitable for fewer weeks of coverage.

How much weekly benefit will I receive:

You can guess your Potential Benefits Online. Your weekly benefit amount and the number of weeks of entitlement to benefits are based on the wages you were paid and amount of time you worked during your base period. The weekly benefit amount is calculated by dividing the sum of the wages earned during the highest quarter of the base period by 26, rounded down to the next lower whole dollar. The result cannot exceed the utmost weekly benefit permitted by rule.

The base period is the term used to describe the time frame used as the basis for deciding whether or not you will be monetarily eligible for unemployment.

How are Benefits Calculated:

Once you make out how the unemployment are calculated, you will have a fair idea of how much you could receive per week or per benefit period if you were to lose your job. This is significant when you think taking unemployment or searching another job.

Unemployment is computed and one half of what your weekly pay was at the time of the discharge up to your state's maximum benefit. You will have to verify with your state's unemployment office to see what the highest payout for your state is. For further details refer unemployment benefits article.

Recently Asked Questions:

What can I expect after I file my unemployment application?

Whether you file your initial unemployment application online or by telephone, staff need to process the application. This can take a few days when workload is heavy. Once the application is processed, the unemployment depatment will mail you a Wage and Potential Benefit Report and a Claimant Handbook.

On the first Sunday or Monday after you filed your application, file a claim for the prior week. You can file your claim for the prior week online or by phone on our Weekly Claim Line. You need to file a weekly claim for each week you are unemployed and wish to receive benefits, including your first or “waiting week.“

If there are any issues on your claim to investigate, be sure to respond to all letters or telephone messages right away. Continue to make your weekly claims while investigation is in process. If you don’t make a weekly claim, the investigation can't begin. It can take three to four weeks to complete the investigation.

You may be scheduled to attend an orientation meeting at a WorkSource Oregon office. If you do not go, your benefits will be delayed. Depending on the reason you didn’t go, your benefits could be denied.



How do I get my PIN? And what is a CID?

Personal Identification Number

You chose a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when you first filed your initial unemployment application, whether you filed online or by telephone. You will use the same PIN throughout your claim. You will need it whenever you access the Online Claim System and to claim weekly benefits whether online or by telephone. Agency employees do not know your PIN. If you forget it, you will have to ask to reset it so that you can choose a new PIN. You are responsible for the security of your PIN. Do not share it with anyone and don’t let others use it.

Claimant Identification Number

Your Claimant Identification Number (CID) is a number assigned only to you at the time you filed your initial unemployment application. We use it on the documents we send to you as a way to safeguard your claim and Social Security number from identity theft. You will need your CID to change your address or apply for direct deposit through the Online Claim System. . The labor department will not give out your CID, even to you if you call, so please keep a record of it.

What is a Waiting Week?

The Waiting Week is the first week on your claim in which you meet all eligibility requirements. You do not receive payment for your waiting week. Every unemployment account must have a Waiting Week before the unemployment department can start making benefit payments.

Important: You must claim the week in order for it to be your Waiting Week. Simply filing your application does not give you credit for your waiting week.



What can delay, stop, or reduce my benefits?

Benefits are payable only if you are eligible. Common issues which require investigation and could result in you not receiving benefits include:

  • Quitting your job;
  • Being fired or suspended from work;
  • Missing an opportunity for work during a week you claim;
  • Refusing work;
  • Turning down or not contacting the employer when referred by a WorkSource Oregon office;
  • Missing a scheduled orientation meeting with a WorkSource Oregon office;
  • Illness or injury;
  • Failing to look for work;
  • School attendance;
  • Being out of the area unless you are looking for work;
  • Not being willing or ready to take work;
  • Receiving retirement pay, vacation pay, or holiday pay;
  • Skipping a week without restarting your claim; and
  • Answering a question on your weekly claim in a way that raises an issue.

If there is a problem, the labor department will contact you either by phone or mail. They will explain the problem and how it could affect your claim. They will ask you for details about the situation. Please reply quickly if you get a form to complete, a letter asking for information, or a telephone message; your benefits could be delayed until you answer. If you do not answer at all, they may deny benefits.

Continue to make your weekly claims either online or on the Weekly Claim Line while the staff investigate your claim.

The unemployment department will make a decision based on information from you, your employer or other sources. If the decision allows benefits and you meet all eligibility conditions, we pay any benefits you have coming. Any time they deny benefits, they will send you a decision explaining why they denied benefits, for what time period, how to requalify, and how to appeal if you disagree.



How do I change my mailing address?

You can change your mailing address through the Online Claim System You will need to enter your Social Security number, your customer ID number (CID) and your PIN in order to access the address change screen. Your CID is printed on every document the unemployment department mail you.

You can also call your UI Center or notify us in writing of your address change, even if you have stopped reporting.

Each January, the labor department mails out Form 1099G, Statement for Recipients of Unemployment Compensation Payments, for use in filing your tax returns. they mail the form to the latest mailing address that they have on each claim. If they don’t have your current address on file, the Post Office will not forward the form.

Note: Changing your address in the iMatchskills program or with the Post Office does not change it on your claim record.



How do I start or stop tax withholding?
You can choose to have state or federal taxes, both, or neither withheld from your benefits. You can change your withholding after filing your claim, but tax regulations require changes to tax withholding be made in writing. Complete an Authorization for Tax Withholding, Form 1040WH, and mail your request to the Employment Department at PO Box 14135, Salem, OR 97309 or fax it to (866) 345-1878. Be sure to include your name and either Social Security number or customer ID number (CID).

How does retirement pay affect my benefits?

Retirement pay could reduce your benefits, make you ineligible, or have no effect at all. If you are not eligible for periodic payments, it has no effect. If an employer for whom you worked during the base year of your claim either contributed to the retirement fund or maintained it, then your retirement pay is deducted dollar for dollar.

Social Security does not affect your benefits unless you do not want to work full time, put limits on the type of work you will do, or if you do not want to look for work any more.



What if I work for a temporary agency?

If you work for a temporary or employee leasing agency, you may receive benefits between assignments or if you are working part time. You must still meet all other eligibility requirements.

You are an employee of the agency even if you always work at other businesses. When restarting your claim after working for a temporary or employee leasing agency, list the agency as your employer, not the business you were sent to help. Also, tell us the reason the assignment ended; lack of work (completed the assignment), quitting (leaving the assignment before it ends), or being fired (taken off the assignment before it ends).

Assignments may last a few hours or days, or may continue for months. When your assignment ends always check in with your agency at once. They may have a new assignment for you. If you refuse a new assignment, you may be disqualified from receiving benefits.



Where can I get help finding a job?
The Employment Department provides a broad range of services to assist in your return to work. Employer job listings, resume writing resources, career exploration tools and labor market information are among the services provided. Staff is available to assist you and introduce you to the services that will benefit you in your work search.

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