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Vermont Unemployment Eligibility

To be eligible for unemployment benefits in Vermont, you must meet the following requirements.

Non Monetary Eligibility

  • Have been separated from employment through no fault of your own or have had your hours reduced.
  • Be able to work.
  • Be available for work.
  • Be actively seeking employment.
  • Be fired or quit voluntarily for “good cause” connected with work
  • Must register for work in the Department’s Vermont JobLink system.

Note: If a claimant moves out of state, they MUST register in that state, with or without prompting by the Department of Labor.  A list of other state Resource Center offices is provided.  Bottom line is, any time a claimant is not appropriate registered for work, they fail to meet one of the eligibility requirements and will be denied benefits.

Monetary Eligibility

Base Periods:

Determining an unemployed worker’s eligibility for benefits is a multi-step process.  First, the worker must have earned a sufficient amount of wages during his or her “base period” to be considered “monetarily” eligible. A “base period” is four successive calendar quarters that fall within the 18 month period prior to establishing a new benefit year.

Method One:

Any time a worker becomes monetarily eligible under method one, (s)he must be paid under this method, which uses all wages paid during the first four of the last five completed calendar quarters immediately preceding the date the worker calls to file his or her claim for benefits.

To be monetarily eligible for benefits under “monetary method one”, the worker must have been paid at least the current minimum quarter amount during one of those calendar quarters. (Note: this minimum amount can change each year in July if the minimum wage per hour increases).  Additionally, the worker must also have been paid wages equal to at least 40% of highest quarter in the remaining three calendar quarters of the base period.

Method Two:

If an unemployed worker is not monetarily eligible under monetary method one, the department will use the last four completed calendar quarters preceding the effective date of the claim as the base period. Again, to be monetarily eligible under “monetary method two”, the worker must have been paid at least the current minimum quarter amount in one of the four calendar quarters and the worker must also have been paid wages equal to at least 40% of highest quarter in the remaining three calendar quarters of the base period.

Method Three:

If the unemployed worker is not monetarily eligible under monetary method two, the department will use the last three completed calendar quarters and wages paid in the current quarter up to the effective date of the claim as the base period. Again, to be monetarily eligible under “monetary method three”, the worker must have been paid at least the current minimum quarter amount in one of the four calendar quarters.

Since the wage reports for the last completed and current calendar quarters (used under the monetary methods two and three) will not yet have been received, a special request for these quarter’s wages will be sent to all employers who furnished employment to the individual during these quarters.  Again, the worker must also meet the other two monetary requirements to become monetarily eligible.

Method Four:

This method is only available to individuals who have been receiving Workers Compensation benefits because of temporary total disability. A former Workers’ Compensation recipient will be entitled to receive unemployment insurance benefits, which would have been available at the time of separation from employment, as long as the worker, at the time of filing,

  1. is not monetarily eligible under other monetary methods
  2. has filed a claim within six months after the termination of the period of temporary total disability
  3. is otherwise eligible for unemployment insurance
  4. has met the minimum quarterly qualifier, along with meeting the 40% rule previously described

Eligibility Questions

What happens if I quit voluntarily?

If you quit a job for personal reasons not attributable to the employer you may be disqualified from receiving benefits until you have started new employment, earned six times your weekly Benefit amount, and become unemployed through no fault of your own.

The department will determine if there is anything regarding your separation from employment that would create an “issue” on your claim, such as a voluntary quit, a discharge, a medical separation, or separation pay. This may create an “issue” on your claim and therefore require you to go through the adjudication process.

Can I collect Unemployment if I am fired?

If you were fired for misconduct the standard disqualification of 10 weeks is usually imposed. In addition, a cap on the maximum number of weeks to be claimed in a benefit year will be imposed to not exceed 23 full weeks.

If you were fired for gross misconduct you may be disqualified from receiving benefits until you have started new employment, earned six times your weekly benfit amount, and become unemployed through no fault of your own.

Separation for gross misconduct will prohibit the use of wages earned from the separating employer for calculation of your weekly benefit amount.

What happens if I am laid off from my job?

There is no penalty or reduction in UI benefits if you are laid off. Your employer will be sent a notice to verify that you were laid off.

Unemployment benefits are designed to help those who lost their jobs through reasons beyond their own control.

If you get laid off because the business can’t afford, you are usually eligible for unemployment benefits. If you were laid off because you weren’t right for the job, then also you may be eligible to collect unemployment.

When you get laid-off, it is not your fault. Getting laid-off doesn’t mean that you were fired or you did something wrong. Once you get laid-off from your job, you should immediately apply for unemployment benefits.

What is the Unemployment Fact-finding and Adjudication process about?

The fact-finding and Adjudication is a process dedicated to gathering the facts from interested parties, including the employer and the unemployed worker.  Burden of proof used to help determine eligibility is dependent on the type of issues.  Once the facts have been gathered, a determination will be issued and sent to all interested parties.  Should any interested party disagree with the determination, an appeal can be filed.  Further information on this process may be obtained by clicking here.

More Questions?? —-> Read Eligibility Q & A Section

Want to know about how much you will receive?? —–>Calculate your benefits here

Questions & Answers

  1. Linda LaPira says:

    I lost my spouse June of 2013 and having been looking into moving back to NJ to be near my family. If I leave my job for this reason will I qualified to for unemployment while searching for a new job.

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