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Virginia received Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) approval on August 26 to provide $300 additional weekly benefits under the Lost Wages Assistance program. However, due to various reasons, the state delayed in rolling out the payments. So when can the unemployed expect to receive the extra $300 unemployment benefits in Virginia? This article will break it for you! 

But before that, let’s learn more about the Lost Wages Assistance in Virginia. 

Lost Wages Assistance in Virginia

The unemployed Virginians had expected to receive their extra $300 weekly unemployment benefits on September 30. Though the people would receive these benefits for a limited time, the amount would help people pay first-of-the-month bills and home rent. But without notice, the Virginia Employment Commission changed the benefits distribution date to October 15. 

Joyce Fogg, the VEC spokeswoman, stated, “The timing was due to a programming error, and the agency still hoped to distribute the benefits before October 15.” Fogg further added, “LWA has different eligibility standards and required them to work with the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, which they are not used to doing.” 

“Our staff was working hard to try to get it to happen earlier, and it just didn’t sync. The programs didn’t mesh together,” stated Fogg. 

After their original distribution plan failed, the VEC spokeswoman told 8News that the Department hoped to roll out the funds before October 15. However, the VEC website notified that the qualified could expect to receive payments beginning October 15. 

According to Joyce Fogg, the Department faced several challenges that prompted the second delay in rolling out payments. She said, “Monday was a federal bank holiday, and, on Tuesday, a damaged fiber optic cable outside of the Virginia Information Technologies Agency caused several state websites to shut down for most of the workday.”

“When your computer system is down, no checks get run, no money gets released, no money gets transferred,” stated the VEC spokeswoman. 

When Can You Expect To Receive Extra $300 Unemployment Benefits In Virginia?

The VEC began processing and distributing payments on October 16 under the Lost Wages Assistance program. The Commission said the payments would reach people’s bank accounts or debit cards from October 19. Amounts to qualified claimants will be paid retroactively to August 1 for 6 weeks. That is, qualified Virginians can get up to $1800 in total. 

Who Qualifies For Extra $300 Weekly Unemployment Benefits In Virginia?

Unlike $600 weekly benefits, not everyone who is unemployed can receive $300 additional weekly benefits. To qualify, you should meet certain eligibility requirements.

They include:

  • You are receiving a minimum of $100 weekly benefits through the regular unemployment or any federal program
  • You have self-certified that you lost your job due to the direct result of the pandemic

Note– If you don’t self-certify that you have lost your job due to the pandemic before October 15, you will not qualify for the $300 due to FEMA funding guidelines.

How To Apply For Additional $300 Unemployment Benefits In Virginia?

You need not submit a separate request or application for LWA. All you have to do is self-certify that you are fully or partially unemployed due to the pandemic’s direct result.

What To Do If You Don’t Qualify For $300 Extra Weekly Unemployment Benefits?

If you don’t qualify for the LWA program, you can continue to apply for the regular unemployment benefits program and receive benefits.

You can receive benefits under the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) program, provided you have exhausted all your benefits received through the regular unemployment program. 

The PEUC program offers unemployment benefits for additional 13 weeks. You must file a separate application to receive PEUC benefits. Note that you must submit a separate application to receive PEUC benefits in Virginia

If you have exhausted your PEUC benefits, you can apply for the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program. PUA was created under the CARES Act to provide benefits to the self-employed, gig-workers, etc. who otherwise did not qualify for UI benefits. This program provides benefits for 30 weeks. 

Note– If you are receiving unemployment benefits due to the pandemic, you must continue to certify every week to receive benefits. This holds good even for the PUA program.

Can You Receive $300 Extra Benefits If You Have Lost Your Job Recently?

No, you can receive $300 additional weekly benefits if you have lost your job recently. The benefits are provided depending on your unemployment status in August 2020. 

However, you can apply for the regular Virginia unemployment benefits program. To be eligible for this program, you must meet specific criteria such as:

  • Unemployed through no fault of your own
  • Available, able, and ready to take up a job
  • Have earned minimum wages in your base period 

The Commission will review your application and send you a notice of approval or disqualification. If you are denied unemployment benefits, you can file an appeal.

Final Words

The VEC is receiving a high volume of Unemployment Insurance benefits claims since mid-March. But due to its lack of staff, the Commission had significant delays in processing payments and receiving incoming calls. The VEC has hired additional staff and has updated its claims processing systems, it encourages new claimants to file a claim online. 

 

The pandemic-induced economic downturn had caused millions of Americans to lose their jobs and depend on the federal or state-provided Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits for survival. But as states begin to restart economic activities, people are finding new jobs or returning to their old jobs. But what happens if you get laid off again due to the pandemic? Can you reopen unemployment benefits? 

 The answer is: Yes. You are eligible to reopen unemployment benefits if you have lost your job again. This article will guide you through reopening unemployment benefits and extention of benefits. 

More About Restarting Unemployment Benefits  

You can restart unemployment benefits even if you had filed for them earlier that year. When you first file an unemployment claim, your benefit year begins. Over the next 52 weeks from the date of filing the initial unemployment claim, any benefits you apply for would be added into that benefit year.

When you first apply for unemployment benefits, you qualify to receive payments depending on various factors like how much you earned in your base period, how much you used to earn every week, etc. This amount is the maximum unemployment benefits you can receive every week for a benefit year of 52 weeks.

The number of weeks you can collect unemployment benefits within that 52 weeks depends on your state of residence. While some states like Florida offer benefits for only 12 weeks, others like Montana provide for 28 weeks. However, most states provide benefits for up to 26 weeks. 

It is important to note that you don’t have to use up all your unemployment weeks consecutively but within a year of when you filed initial unemployment benefits.

For instance, let’s say you live in a state that offers 28 weeks of unemployment benefits. You qualify for the payment and collect benefits for 14 weeks. Thereafter, you get a full-time job, and so you stop collecting benefits. If the business shuts down, then you still have 14 weeks to collect unemployment benefits before your benefit year expires.

What If You Are Still Unemployed Past The 52 Weeks?

If you are unemployed for the past 52 weeks, you can continue to apply for unemployment benefits. However, the probability of you qualifying to receive payments is very low. That is because Unemployment Insurance benefits are generally based on your past four quarters’ earnings. If you haven’t earned any income in the past four quarters, you will not be eligible for benefits in the following benefit year.

How To Reapply For Unemployment Benefits?

You can reapply for unemployment benefits by logging into your account registered on the state’s Department Of Labor (DOL) website. Provide the necessary information and answer the questions like how much did you earn, etc. 

Note that you must notify the Department that you are earning wages on the first day you took up the job and not when you get your first paycheck. 

For instance, if you are joining the date of June 15 but won’t be paid until June 30, you must stop applying for your unemployment benefit on June 15.

Will Unemployment Benefits Be Extended?

Some states have extended unemployment benefits, but many others haven’t yet. The states will extend benefits only if their unemployment rate exceeds the threshold level. This does not mean that you will not receive any benefits if you have exhausted your regular benefits. 

You can still receive payments under the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) program. This program was implemented under the CARES Act and aimed at providing benefits for an additional 13 weeks. “If you were laid off for more than 26 weeks, you could restart and go into PEUC, probably,” stated Evermore, referring to the PEUC program.

Note that you can receive benefits through the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation program if you exhaust benefits received under the regular and extended benefits (in case your state provides).

For instance, if your state provides 26 weeks of regular benefits and 7 weeks of extended benefits, you can collect benefits through the PEUC program when you exhaust all benefits received through the regular and extended programs. This indicates that you can receive payment for a total of 46 (26+7+13) weeks.

But suppose your state is providing regular benefits for 26 weeks but no extended benefits, and you have exhausted your benefits. In that case, you can qualify for the PEUC program when you exhaust benefits received through the regular unemployment program. This indicates that you can collect benefits for a total 39 (26+13) weeks. 

If you have exhausted benefits received through the PEUC program, you can apply for the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program. The program was created under the CARES Act to provide benefits to those who otherwise did not qualify to receive benefits under the regular UI program like the self-employed, independent contractors, etc. The program provides benefits for 39 weeks. 

When Will The Extended Benefits End?

Both PEUC and PUA are scheduled to end on December 31, 2020, unless another stimulus package extends them. So far, the Republicans and Democrats have failed to reach an agreement on another Coronavirus stimulus package. That means millions of unemployed Americans will stop receiving benefits when the year ends. 

What Happens If The Extended Benefits End?

Your maximum weekly unemployment benefits reset to what is provided in your state unless the new unemployment stimulus package is announced. However, suppose the unemployment rate soars again, Congress may announce another stimulus package or extend the benefits period, or may even allow people to collect benefits through a regular unemployment program beyond 52 weeks. 

So if you have been unemployed since April 1, 2020, and qualify for the Unemployment Insurance program, you may be able to continue receiving benefits beyond April 1, 2021.

Closing Thoughts 

You can qualify for an unemployment program without any hassle and get benefits unless you fail to provide the necessary documentation to the Department Of Labor. Therefore, make sure you provide precise details regarding your earnings, work hours, etc. To know more about the unemployment programs or claim reopening process, visit your state’s Labor Department website. 

 

Recently, President Donald Trump called off negotiations for the fifth round of the Coronavirus stimulus package. This implies that millions of unemployed Americans looking for a boost in unemployment benefits are out of luck, at least for some time, and may have to depend on regular unemployment benefits from the federal or state government. In some states, it may be as little as $5 a week.

Why Isn’t The Federal Government Giving A New Stimulus Bill?

After weeks of failed discussion on the new stimulus package between the Congress and the White House, President Donald Trump put an end to negotiations until after the election.

On October 6, President Trump tweeted, “I am rejecting their request, and looking to the future of our Country. I have instructed my representatives to stop negotiating until after the election when, immediately after I win, we will pass a major Stimulus Bill that focuses on hardworking Americans and Small Business.” 

Effects Of Delay In The New Stimulus Package 

According to the U.S. Department Of Labor (DOL) reports, there is a surge in new unemployment claims filed across the United States, and more than 26 million Americans are presently collecting unemployment benefits.

A delay in the new stimulus package (or enhanced unemployment benefits), like as mentioned earlier, will force the unemployed Americans to solely rely on their traditional or regular Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits, provided by the federal or state government and settle down with just $5 a week. 

Also, the delay will kill the hopes of those looking for extending enhanced unemployment benefits. The situation would be similar to that when the $600 weekly benefit provided under the CARES Act ended in July and also the expiration of the subsequent $300 to $400 weekly benefit announced through an executive order in August. 

How Much Benefits Do States Provide Under The Regular Unemployment Program?

According to the Department Of Labor’s August reports, the states pay $1,220.36 unemployment benefits per month or $305.09 per week. Note that this is not the precise number but only the average.

It is important to understand that the amount of benefits paid per week varies from one state to another as they have to balance the checkbook. Below, let’s see which states pay more weekly benefits and which pay less.

States That Pay the Highest Weekly Unemployment Insurance Benefits

According to the reports of the Labor Department, the following states pay the highest unemployment benefits. 

  • Massachusetts pays up to $1,234 a week
  • Minnesota pays up to $740 a week
  • Washington pays up to $790 a week

Note – The higher weekly payments result from having dependents.

Most states pay a maximum of $400 or more weekly benefits. The maximum unemployment benefit across the U.S. is about $2,104 per month or $526 weekly on average.

States That Pay the Lowest Weekly Unemployment Insurance Benefits

The following states pay the lowest minimum unemployment benefits. 

  • Hawaii pays as low as $5 a week
  • North Carolina pays as little as $15 a week
  • Louisiana as low as $10 a week

Many states pay benefits less than $100 (minimum) per week. The average minimum benefit across the U.S. is $244 per month or $61 weekly.

Are States Paying Benefits Equal To the Federal Minimum Wage?

It is estimated that most states pay less unemployment benefits a week than one could earn by working for approximately 40 hours at the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. According to the Economic Policy Institute, “A parent working full time while earning the minimum wage today earns too little to bring his family, even if it is just a family of two above the federal poverty line.”

Standalone Bill: An Alternative Relief Measure

Even though President Donald Trump called off negotiations for a comprehensive stimulus deal, he has indicated that he is willing to send another round of $1,200 stimulus checks and approving funding for airlines and small businesses. 

$1,200 Stimulus Checks 

President Donald Trump announced he would sign a bill authorizing another $1,200 stimulus check at the earliest. The checks are believed to help thousands of unemployed Americans, however, a shift in eligibility criteria would impact the individual’s final payment. 

The second stimulus check is expected to give $1,200 to the eligible adults, and qualifying child dependents are expected to get $1,000. Older adults, including retirees over age 65 are also likely to be eligible for a second stimulus check. Many factors would contribute to the chances of receiving the second check for retired and older adults. Some of the factors include the AGI, tax filings, pension, whether the IRS considers them a dependent person, and the SSDI program (only if they are a part of it). 

Airline Assistance

The airlines are one of the sectors worst hit by the Coronavirus-induced economic shutdown. Ever since the pandemic began, the sector has furloughed thousands of employees and is expecting assistance to survive through the crisis. Having understood the situation, the negotiators have tagged airline assistance for standalone legislation. 

On October 8, Pelosi stated, “Let me just be really clear. I have been very open to having a standalone bill for the airlines.” 

Earlier, the House had passed a $28.8 billion airline support bill that acted as the starting point for legislation. 

Paycheck Protection Program

The Payroll Protection Program (PPP) was a part of the CARES Act announced in March 2020. PPP aimed at providing forgivable loans guaranteed by the federal to the small businesses to cover their payroll and other costs. President Trump stated that he would “sign now” a bill that authorizes extra funding to protect small-business payrolls.

Closing Thoughts 

The $1,200 stimulus check is intended to help unemployed Americans to get through pandemic-related expenses and boost the U.S. economy. However, it is still unclear whether the qualified can expect to receive the checks any time soon. 

 

Millions of Americans were paid Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits. While some received the entitled amount, many others were mistakenly overpaid. Since the overpayment is against the federal laws governing UI benefits, many states are asking to repay the overpaid unemployment benefits. This article will tell which states are trying to recover the overpaid amount and what you should do if you are overpaid. 

States That Are Asking To Repay The Overpaid Unemployment Benefits

Many states are asking claimants to repay the overpaid unemployment benefits. Some of them include North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, and Texas

While the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) overpaid about 185,000 people between March 1 and September 15, under the regular UI program, the Department of Job and Family Services, Ohio, paid about 108,000 people eligible for the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program (PUA).

States can waive repayments of certain unemployment benefits programs. But the PUA program, which was established under the CARES Act to provide benefits to the self-employed, gig workers, independent contractors, and others who are otherwise not qualified for the unemployment program, is administered differently than other types of unemployment programs. Hence the states would ask the claimants to repay the overpaid amount.  

Reasons For Overpayment Of Unemployment Benefits 

There are various reasons for the overpayment of unemployment benefits. Some of them include:

  • You have accidentally entered incorrect earnings
  • The state has miscalculated the amount of the benefit
  • You have not informed the state that you have begun a new job
  • You have intentionally given incorrect or misleading information when filing a weekly claim 

What Happens If You Are Overpaid?

If you are overpaid, the Department Of Labor (DOL) of your state will notify you about your state trying to recover the additional payments. The notice may also indicate that you were overpaid or get lower unemployment benefits or no benefits until the additional payments are recovered. The Department of Labor can change the amount of your entitled benefits based on new information about your work search activity or any other crucial factors. 

What To Do If Your State Asks You To Repay The Overpaid Benefits?

Suppose you receive a notice from the DOL regarding the overpayment but do not agree with it. In that case, you have the right to determine if the Department believes you were overpaid or if your unemployment benefits will change. This can be done through a fact-finding interview.  

During the interview process, you will have to give all the information and evidence that supports your claim to the Deputy. The Deputy will review your case and send the judgment in writing. 

If you were overpaid due to no fault of your own or incorrect information you submitted mistakenly, you could consider filing an appeal or an overpayment waiver. 

How To File For Overpayment Waiver?

If you believe that overpayment was not your fault and you cannot repay the additional amount, you can file an overpayment waiver. You can request an overpayment waiver by filing the Social Security Administration (SSA) form. 

After filing the form, do any of the following to prove that you have requested the waiver in writing. 

  1. Get 2 copies of the form to the SSA office and request them to date stamp the copies. Give them one copy for records and another keep for yourself. 
  2. Fax the form to the Social Security office. Keep the fax confirmation printout. Also, make sure that Social Security has received the fax.  

SSA will receive your form and decide if the overpayment was due to your fault or not. It will also determine if you promptly informed them about your income and your present financial situation. If SSA determines that you have been receiving additional payments but haven’t informed the authorities, it will consider the overpayment was due to your fault. 

What Happens If You Get The Waiver?

If you get the waiver, some or all of the repayment may be suspended. If your overpayment is partially waived, the state will recover the remaining amount by deducting from your future unemployment benefits.

What Happens If You Do Not Get A Waiver?

If your waiver gets rejected, you will have to repay the overpaid amount to the state. The overpayment collection process varies from one state to another. While some states like Illinois recover the overpaid amount by asking the individuals to allow the state to keep up 25% of the future unemployment benefits, states like North Carolina let individuals repay the amount by credit, debit card, or money order. 

Determine how your state’s overpayment collection process works and negotiate a payment plan. If you fail to repay or make a payment plan, the Labor Department may issue a civil warrant to recover the payment. Your lottery winnings or state income tax refund can also be used to repay the overpayment. 

File An Appeal With Supreme Court

If you still believe that you are eligible for a waiver, you can file an appeal in Superior Court (80C appeal) but within 10 days from the date of receiving the waiver rejection. 

The Superior Court will examine the facts and evidence (if any) submitted by the Department. If the Court finds the Department’s decision unconstitutional, it may change the Department’s decision regarding your waiver appeal. 

Note – If the overpayment was a mistake, you would be required to pay 1% monthly interest, starting one year following the overpayment.

Closing Thoughts 

If you suspect or believe there is a mistake in the amount of benefits you are receiving, then keep your expenses under control as you can repay the Department Of Labor, if it sends you a notice of overpayment at any time. But if you believe that you are not receiving the entitled amount, file an unemployment appeal. 

 

Unemployment benefits, popularly known as Reemployment Assistance in Florida, are given to people who are unemployed through no fault of their own and meet state-defined eligibility requirements. However, ever since the Coronavirus pandemic spread across Florida, the state made several changes to the eligibility requirements. In this detailed article, we will guide you through every little detail pertaining to unemployment benefits in Florida. 

Unemployment Benefits In Florida During The Pandemic 

Millions of Americans lost their job as a direct result of the pandemic. To help the unemployed meet their needs during the crisis, President Donald Trump announced The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The Act included several provisions like extended benefits, unemployment benefits for those who otherwise did not qualify for benefits, etc. 

After consulting and receiving guidelines from the U.S. Department Of Labor (DOL), the Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO) began implementing various unemployment benefits in Florida. 

The unemployment benefits programs implemented in the state under the CARES Act are as follows:

1. Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA)

PUA is aimed at providing benefits to unemployed gig workers, independent contractors, self-employed, and others who do not qualify for regular benefits. Under this program, you can receive benefits for up to 39 weeks. The program is expected to end in December 2020. 

2. Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC)

Under this program, those who qualified for Reemployment Assistance and PUA received $600 additional weekly unemployment benefits. This program expired on July 25 and was replaced by $300 extra weekly benefits. 

3. Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC)

PEUC program provides unemployment benefits for an additional 13 weeks. To qualify for this program, you must exhaust the benefits received through the Reemployment Assistance program. The program is expected to end in December 2020. 

Note – You are required to renew your PUA or PEUC applications every new quarter. To know more about it visit the DEO website.

Who Qualifies For Unemployment Benefits In Florida During The Pandemic?

Generally, to qualify for regular Florida unemployment benefits, you should meet work search requirements apart from being unemployed through no fault of your own. However, due to the pandemic, the DEO has waived the work search and online work registration requirements until December 2020. 

Though these eligibility criteria have been waived, you may still see the requirement pop-up when certifying your weeks. In such a situation, enter “COVID19” in the field to get past the work search requirement.

Extended Unemployment Benefits In Florida

Recently the DEO announced that if the unemployment rate exceeds 5% in the third quarter, it will roll out benefits for extended weeks. The extended benefit weeks would come into effect in January 2021. The Department further added that it calculates the state’s number of weeks for Reemployment Assistance based on the recent third calendar year quarter’s average unemployment rate. 

DEO is said to add six weeks of extended weeks in December 2020. Generally, Florida provides 12 weeks of unemployment benefits. With extended benefits, the duration is capped at a total of 23 weeks. 

Who Qualifies For Extended Unemployment Benefits In Florida?

To qualify for the extended unemployment benefits, you must exhaust your payment received through Reemployment Assistance and the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation program. If you have already exhausted your FEUC benefits, you can apply for the PUA program since extended benefits have not rolled out yet. 

Note that the Department is setting up systems to roll out the extended benefits as early as possible. Once Extended Benefits, the Department will outreach the qualified to ensure they are receiving benefits through the program.

Latest Updates On Unemployment Benefits In The State

The Department of Economic Opportunity has clarified various aspects of the unemployment benefits in the state. Here, let’s have a look at a few among them. 

1. Over Payment

If you have been overpaid, make sure you do not spend the extra money. This is because: 

  • The Department may ask you to return it 
  • The Department may deduct the amount from your future benefits to make up for the difference

Note that the DEO will contact you if it suspects overpayment.

2. Going Back To Work

If you have begun taking a job, you may continue to request benefits for the weeks you were unemployed. If there is a week that overlaps with the week that you took up a job, you must indicate that you have worked and earned wages during that week. 

If you have taken up a full-time job or earned over $275 in gross wages during the overlapping week, then you will not qualify for benefits that week. However, if you have earned less than $275, you may qualify for benefits.

3. Backdating Unemployment Claims 

The Department has announced backdating unemployment claims. To backdate your regular claim, call the authorities at 833-FL-APPLY (1–833–352- 7759). If you are a PUA beneficiary, you need not take any additional steps. You will be automatically backdated, depending on your total claim that shows when you were unemployed. 

Note that the Department is said to conduct a fact-finding to cross-check if the date you requested is accurate when backdating claims. It is important to know that backdating regular claims may result in an overpayment which the Department will recover by deducting the amount from your PEUC. 

Keep checking your mail and CONNECT inbox to ensure you do not miss updates from DEO.

4. Account Is Blocked

Your account may be blocked or put on hold if there are any identity verification issues. You can reach out to the authorities at the legislative office with your Claimant ID and request them to unlock your account. 

Closing Thoughts 

The Department of Economic Opportunity is going the extra mile to help unemployed Floridians meet their end needs during the crisis. Do not worry if you have not yet received benefits. The Department may take some time due to enormous applications, but it will certainly pay you, provided you qualify for it. If you have already exhausted benefits, then patiently wait for the extended benefits while searching for a job.  

 

In total, 49 states received the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) approval to pay out $300 additional weekly benefits to the qualified people. Some states began giving out payments in August, others had to wait till September. While some states are still paying $300 unemployment benefits, others have depleted their funding. 

This article will guide you through the states that are still paying out an extra $300 weekly unemployment benefits to the eligible people. 

List Of States That Are Still Paying $300 Unemployment Benefits

1. Alabama 

The state received FEMA approval on August 21 and began rolling out payments on September 3. According to the Alabama Department of Labor, the residents will be notified if they have qualified for additional unemployment benefits and if they need to take any additional steps to receive the payments. The state will continue to provide $300 benefits per week until it runs out of funds. 

2. Alaska 

Though Alaska received FEMA’s approval on August 23, it did not begin paying its residents’ additional weekly benefits yet. The state is expected to begin paying out benefits in mid-October. According to the authorities, the eligible Alaskans need not take any steps to enroll in the program. The state will automatically pay them benefits. 

3. Arkansas 

Arkansas is one of the states that is still paying $300 unemployment benefits. The state received FEMA’s approval on August 25 and began rolling out benefits in September. The Division of Workforce stated that qualified people need not take any action to receive extra unemployment benefits in Arkansas. The authorities will send letters to the qualified residents notifying that they will receive the payments. 

4. California

California received FEMA’s approval on August 21 and began paying out benefits on September 7. The extra benefits are expected to last only for three weeks in the state. According to the Employment Development Department (EDD), qualified residents need not take any extra action to receive the payments as the Department will automatically collect details and pay benefits. 

5. Colorado 

The state received FEMA’s approval on August 16 and began paying out benefits on September 18. The Department of Labor and Employment announced that it would pay the extra unemployment benefits in Colorado in two installments, and the program would end when it runs out of funding.

6. Connecticut 

Connecticut received approval from FEMA on August 24 and started paying its residents on September 17. Residents who are already receiving benefits through regular and the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program (PUA) need not take any action to enroll in the Lost Wages Assistance (LWA) program. 

But new claimants must self-certify that they are unemployed due to the direct result of COVID-19 to receive an additional $300 unemployment benefits in Connecticut. 

7. Delaware 

Delaware received FEMA’s approval on September 2 and began paying out benefits on September 14. The state requires the residents to self-certify that they are unemployed due to COVID-19 to receive the payments. 

8. Florida 

The state received FEMA’s approval on August 29. According to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, no additional applications are required if one is receiving benefits through the Reemployment Assistance program. Initially, the state announced that it would provide benefits for up to six weeks, but the LWA program will end faster than expected. 

9. Georgia 

FEMA approved the state’s application on August 23. According to the authorities, those who are receiving benefits through regular unemployment and the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program will not be required to take any additional actions to receive benefits. 

10. Hawaii

Hawaii received FEMA approval on August 29, but it didn’t start paying benefits yet. The Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial stated that the eligible people could expect to receive payments in October. 

To receive additional unemployment benefits in Hawaii, one should self-certify that he or she is unemployed due to the direct result of COVID-19. But those receiving benefits through the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program need not make any additional action.

11. Illinois

The state received FEMA’s approval on September 1. However, it is unclear when it will begin to give away benefits. According to the authorities, the residents who are receiving benefits through the regular unemployment program and meet state listed requirements need not take any additional action to receive additional Illinois unemployment benefits.  

12. Indiana

The state received FEMA’s approval on August 21, and the payment is set to begin on September 21. According to the Indiana Department of Workforce Development, residents should self-certify to receive additional weekly Indiana unemployment benefits. 

13. Kansas

Kansas was approved for extra unemployment funding on September 7. To qualify for $300 weekly unemployment benefits in Kansas, the residents should self-certify that they lost their job due to COVID-19. 

14. Kentucky

The state received FEMA’s approval on August 21. According to the Kentucky Office of Unemployment Insurance, the qualified people will receive $400 additional benefits. To receive additional Kentucky unemployment benefits, residents will be required to self-certify that they are unemployed due to COVID-19.

15. Maine

Kansas was approved for extra unemployment funding on August 25 and began giving out benefits on September 11. Residents who didn’t notify that they lost their job due to the direct result of COVID-19 must self-certify. If additional information is required, the authorities will mail a letter or notify such residents through their ReEmployME account correspondence tab.

16. Maryland

Maryland was approved for extra unemployment funding on August 29 and began giving out benefits on September 11. To qualify for extra Maryland unemployment benefits, residents must self-certify that they lost their job due to the direct result of COVID-19.

17. Michigan 

The state received FEMA’s approval on August 21. To receive extra unemployment benefits in Michigan, residents must self-certify that they have lost their job due to COVID-19. The benefits will be given until the state runs out of funding.  

18. Mississippi

Mississippi was approved for extra unemployment funding on August 22 and began giving out benefits on September 12. To qualify for extra Mississippi unemployment benefits, residents need not file additional applications. The payments will be added to their existing unemployment benefits.

19. Nebraska

The state received FEMA’s approval on September 9. To receive extra Nebraska unemployment benefits, residents must self-certify that they have lost their job due to COVID-19. The benefits will be given until the state runs out of funding.  

20. Nevada 

Nevada is one of the states that are still paying $300 unemployment benefits. The state which received FEMA’s approval on September 11 will pay benefits until it runs out of funds. To qualify for additional unemployment benefits in Nevada, residents must self-certify that they are unemployed due to COVID-19. The residents can expect to receive the payment in 4 to 6 weeks.

21. New Jersey

New Jersey received FEMA approval for extra federal unemployment funding on September 4. It is unclear if residents should take extra action to enroll in the program. The state is expected to provide benefits until it runs out of funds.

22. New Mexico

New Mexico is one of the states that are still paying $300 unemployment benefits. The state received FEMA’s approval on August 15 and began rolling out benefits on September 3. According to the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions, residents must self-certify that they are unemployed due to the direct result of COVID-19 to enroll in Lost Wages Assistance benefits.

23. North Carolina

The state received FEMA’s approval on August 21 and began giving benefits on September 3. To receive extra North Carolina unemployment benefits, residents must self-certify that they have lost their job due to COVID-19. The benefits will be given until the state runs out of funding.  

24. North Dakota

New Dakota is one of the states that are still paying $300 unemployment benefits. The state received FEMA’s approval on August 31 and began rolling out benefits on September 10. According to the Job Service North Dakota, residents must self-certify that they are unemployed due to the direct result of COVID-19 to enroll in Lost Wages Assistance benefits.

25. Ohio

Ohio received FEMA approval for extra federal unemployment funding on August 26. According to the Department of Job and Family Services, residents must self-certify that they lost a job due to the direct result of COVID-19 to receive benefits. 

26. Oregon

Oregon was approved for extra unemployment funding on August 28. To qualify for extra Oregon unemployment benefits, residents must self-certify that they have lost their job due to COVID-19. The Oregon Unemployment Department has launched the self-certification process for applicants to submit evidence they have lost work due to the direct result of COVID-19. 

27. Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania was approved for extra $300 unemployment funding on August 24 and began rolling out payments on September 10. To enroll in the Lost Wages Assistance, residents must self-certify that they are unemployed due to COVID-19.

28. Rhode Island

Rhode Island received approval from FEMA on August 22 and started paying its residents on September 3. The Department of Labor and Training announced that residents who are already receiving unemployment benefits would automatically receive the enhanced payments and need not take any action to enroll in the Lost Wages Assistance program. 

29. South Carolina

The state received FEMA’s approval on September 1. To be eligible for an additional $300 unemployment benefits in South Carolina, residents must self-certify that they are unemployed due to COVID-19 to receive the payments. The South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce is expected to begin paying out benefits late September or early October. 

30. Vermont

Vermont was approved for extra unemployment benefits funding on August 22. It will provide $400, of which $300 is given by the federal, and the state contributes $ 100. To qualify for $400 weekly unemployment benefits in Vermont, residents who receive benefits through Pandemic Unemployment Assistance need not take any additional action. But those collecting benefits through the traditional unemployment program must take state listed additional steps

31. Virginia

Virginia was approved for the extra unemployment funding on August 26 and began giving out benefits on September 30. To enroll in the Lost Wages Assistance program, residents who didn’t indicate to authorities that they lost their job due to the direct result of COVID-19 must self-certify.

32. Washington

The state received FEMA’s approval on August 24 and began paying benefits on September 22. To qualify for $300 additional Vermont weekly unemployment benefits, residents who receive benefits through Pandemic Unemployment Assistance need not take any additional steps. But those collecting benefits through the traditional unemployment program must take state listed additional actions

33. Wisconsin

Wisconsin received FEMA’s approval on September 1. The residents can expect to receive payments in October. To qualify for additional unemployment benefits in Wisconsin, claimants need not undertake any additional actions. The state will automatically add benefits to regular payments. 

34. Wyoming

Wyoming was approved for extra unemployment funding on August 28 and began paying benefits on September 11. To qualify for extra Wyoming unemployment benefits, claimants need not take any additional steps.

Final Words

The $300 additional weekly unemployment benefits are expected to soon deplete in many states, leaving unemployed Americans to look forward to new financial measures. But with the presidential election approaching, it is unlikely another relief aid measure will be implemented any time soon.

 

Ever since the economy has reopened, states have witnessed a dip in the unemployment rate and claims. According to the Labor Department’s reports, the seasonally adjusted initial Unemployment Insurance (UI) claims were 860,000 in the week ending September 12, a decrease of 33,000 claims from the previous week. The 4-week moving average for the week ending September 12 was 912,000, a decrease of 61,000 from the previous week’s revised average. 

While the unadjusted initial claims fell by 8.8% in the week ending September 12 compared to the previous week, the seasonal factors decreased by 4.9% from the previous week. Though the numbers have decreased when compared to the week ending September 5, the states saw 173,134 initial claims in the 2019’s comparable week. In addition, 52 states reported 658,737 initial claims under the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program for the week ending September 12. 

On the other hand, the unadjusted insured unemployment claims for the week ending September 5 decreased 0.7% and seasonal factor by 0.9% from the previous week. 

Though the total number of initial claims decreased in the week ending September 5 when compared to the week ending August 29, some states witnessed increase in the claims. The largest increases in initial claims for the week ending September 5 were in Texas (+8,618), California (+23,841), New Jersey (+2,402), Louisiana (+8,375), and Washington (+2,173).

Unemployment Claims Across Various States 

The number of initial unemployment claims decreased significantly in many states in the week ending September 12. For instance, 

Texas 

In Texas, about 49,644 people filed initial Unemployment Insurance (UI) applications in the week ending September 12. This is the lowest number of claims filed since mid-March. 

Louisiana 

In Louisiana, the initial unemployment claims were 24,566 for the week ending September 5. However, it dropped to 16,182 for the week ending September 12. On the other hand, the continued unemployment claims for the week ending September 12 decreased to 250,244 from 256,184 for the week ending September 5. However, the continued claims were much above the comparable figure for the week ending September 12, 2019. 

Washington 

In Washington, the initial claims dropped by 8% from the previous week. An estimated 18,403 people filed their initial unemployment claims for the week ending September 12. On the other hand, the continued unemployment claims increased by 6.6% from the previous week. 

While the initial claims applications for the traditional Unemployment Insurance program decreased over the week, Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) initial claims increased over the week. 

According to the Employment Security Department (ESD), about 566,443 total unemployment claims (all categories) were filed for the week ending September 12.  

Initial regular claims applications in the state remained at elevated levels. However, they are at 242% above the 2019 year’s weekly new unemployment claims.

Besides the listed states, Massachusetts, Maryland, California, Illinois, South Dakota, etc. received lesser initial unemployment claims for the week ending September 12 than the previous week. However, states like Arizona, Indiana, Kansas, and a few others saw a surge in applications compared to the previous week. 

Reasons For Decrease In Unemployment Claims 

Some states witnessed a dip in the initial claims due to the addition of the Nonfarm payrolls. In August, about 1.37 million jobs were added, leading to improvement in the states’ employment situation. 

In addition, government hiring boosted the labor market, with the growth of approximately 344,000 workers accounting for the monthly gain. The majority hiring came from Census workers, whose rolls surged by 328,000. The local government jobs have also increased by 95,000 regardless of the revenue worries crunched at the municipal level.

These continued efforts helped the states to improve economic activity that curtailed due to the measures taken to contain the Coronavirus pandemic.

Why Is The Unemployment Situation In Some States Recovering Faster?

Several factors are causing economies of some states to recover faster than others. Some of them include: 

1. Fewer Infections And Stronger Recovery

During the early days of the pandemic, many economists repeatedly stressed that the virus trajectory is a major factor that will determine the severity of the economic crisis as well as the speed of its rebound. 

Today, the states operating closest to normal are the ones that recorded the fewest Coronavirus cases. For instance, Maine has recorded the country’s second-lowest infection rate, that is only 366 Coronavirus cases per 100,000 residents. 

In recent times, the state’s economy is operating close to 93% as compared to early March, making it the number one state to be on the Back-to-Normal Index. Like Vermont and New Hampshire, some other states that rank high on the Back-to-Normal Index have recorded the lowest infection rate proving that virus trajectory directly impacts economic activities. 

2. Rural Places Successfully Implements Social Distancing   

Rural states like Idaho, Nebraska, and South Dakota boast stronger economic rebounds than states like Texas, California, and New York, which are among the bottom states on the Back-to-Normal Index. 

This is because Texas, New York, etc. are densely populated, and when social-distancing orders are in effect, there is not sufficient space to roam. This stops people from visiting places like restaurants, thereby impacting such businesses. Also, millions of commuters aren’t able to take public transport and reach their workplace. 

3. Real Estate Is Trending In Some States

East Coast cities like New York and Boston have become popular work-from-home destinations. Also, high mortgage rates in some states have driven the dwellers to abandon their present home and look for first or second homes in cities with lower rates. 

4. Different Sources Of Revenue 

While some states get the majority of its revenue from retail and other industries, states like Hawaii mainly depend on the tourism sector, which is the worst hit by the pandemic. As a result, the economy in such states is far away from recovering. 

Closing Thoughts 

With more and more states restarting the economy, the unemployment rate and claims nationwide are expected to decrease in the coming weeks. However, it is difficult to predict how long it would take for all states to begin operating normally and contribute to the country’s economy. 

New York is one of the states that received the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) approval to provide additional benefits to the unemployed residents. Though it received approval in August, the state has not begun paying out the benefits. If you are wondering when you can expect to collect the $300 unemployment benefits in New York, you have landed on the right page! 

This article will tell you when the state will begin paying out the additional benefits and more. 

When Can You Expect To Receive $300 Unemployment Benefits In New York?

Recently, the New York State Department of Labor (DOL) announced that it would start giving out the extra $300 weekly benefits to unemployed residents beginning next week. The payment will be sent on a rolling basis under the Lost Wages Assistance (LWA) program. The payment will retroactively cover the weeks that ended on August 2, 9, and 16. 

Who Qualifies For $300 Unemployment Benefits In New York?

To be eligible for the additional weekly benefits, you should meet the following eligibility criteria. 

  1. You should be receiving or qualify for receiving a minimum of $100 weekly benefits through any of the following programs. 
  • Regular or traditional New York Unemployment Insurance (UI) Compensation
  • Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC)
  • Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA)
  • Extended Benefits (EB) or any other federal programs 
  1. You should self-certify that you are fully or partially unemployed as a direct result of the Coronavirus pandemic.

Should You Apply For Additional Unemployment Benefits In New York?

According to the state’s Department Of Labor, if you are already receiving payment under the regular unemployment program and have certified that you lost your job due to the pandemic in your initial claim, you need not take any further action. The Department will send you an email or a text message notifying that you have pre-qualified for the additional benefits. 

But if you have not certified, you must do it immediately, failing which you may not receive your additional benefits. You can certify through either online or by phone.  

Note that you can certify starting Friday, September 11th. If you are certifying over the phone, call 833-491-0632, an automated phone system. But if you are certifying online, you should follow the instructions given in the secure DocuSign email that you received from DOL. 

Note – You will receive payments starting next week, provided you have self-certified by 5 pm on September 15th.

How Long Will The Benefits Be Available In The State?

Funding under the LWA program will be available until December 2020 unless any of the following events occurs before the scheduled deadline.

  1. The $44 billion funds set aside for the LWA program is depleted. 
  2. The balance of the federal Disaster Relief Fund falls below $25 billion.
  3. Congress replaces the LWA program.

What To Do If Your Extra Benefits Are Denied?

If your benefits are denied but you believe you qualify, you can file an unemployment appeal. Note that you must file within 30 days from the mailing date of the Determination Notice. Fill the appeal form attached to the Determination Notice and request a hearing with the Department. If the form is not attached, you can fill the online form on the Department’s website. 

The Department will review your application and schedule an informal conference to attempt to resolve the matter. At the conference, you can present evidence and place your argument. 

If you disagree with its decision, you can request a hearing with the Administrative Law Judge. During the hearing, you can present your testimony to support your argument. After inspecting the evidence. the Judge will give his or her decision. 

If you are unhappy with the Administrative Law Judge’s decision, you can file an appeal to the Unemployment Insurance Appeal Board (UIAB). Apply your appeal in writing, within 20 days of the Administrative Law Judge decision. 

The UIAB will review your application and send you a Notice of Receipt of Appeal that explains how to submit a statement on appeal along with the Appeal Board case number. You must submit your statement within 7 days of the date of receiving the Notice of Receipt of Appeal.

You can request to review the hearing transcript before submitting your statement. If you wish to review, the authorities will send a written notice when the file is available. 

The UIAB does not require any additional testimony. It relies on written statements and documents submitted as part of the appeal and evidence used at hearing with the Administrative Law Judge. 

After listening to arguments and inspecting evidence, the UIAB will give its decision. If you disagree with it, you can file an appeal with the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court, Third Judicial Department.

Note – Make sure you don’t miss the hearing. If there is an emergency and you are unable to attend the hearing, request a postponement. 

How To Reschedule A Hearing? 

If you wish to reschedule the hearing, write to the concerned authorities and request an adjournment while mentioning the same reason. If your request is denied, apply for a re-opening.

Can You Collect Extra Benefits If You Are Recently Unemployed?

You will receive $300 unemployment benefits based on your employment status in August 2020. If you have lost your job in September, you may not qualify for extra benefits but only the regular New York Unemployment Insurance program. 

Final Words 

The Department has begun emailing the qualified New Yorkers to inform them of their payment status. If you too are expecting the payment, keep an eye out for messages from DOL, and respond immediately if it requires any additional certification. 

Louisiana is one of the states that have begun paying out $300 additional weekly benefits. The extra payments are provided to help the unemployed to meet their basic needs during the crisis. However, unlike $600, not everyone is eligible for the new enhanced payments. So who qualifies for $300 extra unemployment benefits in Louisiana? 

In this article, we will walk through the eligibility requirements that you must meet to receive the $300 extra benefits. 

When Did The State Began Paying The Additional Benefits?

The state began paying $300 weekly benefits on August 26, 2020 under the FEMA’s Lost Wage Assistance program. It released payments for weeks that ended on August 1, August 8, August 15, and August 22.

Who Can Receive The $300 Extra Unemployment Benefits In Louisiana?

To be eligible for the additional weekly payments, you should receive a minimum of $100 benefits through any of the following programs. 

  • Unemployment Insurance (UI)
  • Extended Benefits (EB)
  • Self-Employment Assistance (SEA)
  • Trade Readjustment Allowances (TRA)
  • Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA)
  • Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC)
  • Unemployment Compensation for Ex-Service members (UCX)
  • Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE)

Note – If you are receiving payments under Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA), you won’t qualify for the enhanced benefits. 

Besides receiving minimum benefits, the state also requires you to certify that you lost your job due to the direct results of the Coronavirus pandemic. 

How Does The State Determine If You Have Lost Your Job Due To The Pandemic?

The state determines if you are unemployed due to the Coronavirus pandemic by considering the following factors. 

  1. You have been diagnosed with the COVID-19 or are experiencing its symptoms and are seeking a medical diagnosis. 
  2. Your family member has been diagnosed with COVID-19.
  3. You are caring for a family member who is diagnosed with COVID-19.
  4. You are unable to reach your workplace due to strict measures enforced as a direct result of COVID-19.
  5. You are unable to reach your workplace because you have been instructed to self-quarantine as you have been diagnosed with COVID-19. 
  6. Your company has shut down due to COVID-19. 
  7. Your type of work has been impacted due to COVID-19. For instance, you are an artist and are unable to perform as venues were closed due to COVID-19.
  8. A child whom you are caring for is unable to go to a care facility or school because they are closed. This includes school that: 
    • Are into virtual learning/online teaching
    • Follow a hybrid model. That is, the school is only open on a few days of the week

Does The State Require Any Proof Of Unemployment Due To The Pandemic?

Though the proof is not required for you to be found eligible for the additional benefits, any documents or other form of evidence may be helpful. In most cases self-certification is enough to prove your unemployment reason.

Should You Apply For $300 Extra Unemployment Benefits In Louisiana?

If you are currently receiving benefits through any of the unemployment benefits program, you need not reapply for the additional benefits. The Commission will provide you with extra benefits using the same details.

How Long Will It Take For You To Receive Benefits?

According to the Louisiana Workforce Commission, it would take an estimated 24-48 for the money to show up in bank accounts. Note that the payment will not show up in your Helping Individuals Reach Employment (HiRE) dashboard but you should check your personal account to determine if you have received your payments. 

What To Do If Your Additional Benefits Are Denied? 

You can file an unemployment appeal if your benefits are denied for monetary or non monetary reasons. But note that you have to apply an appeal within 15 calendar days from the mailing date of the Notice of Determination. In case you appeal after 15 days, the concerned authorities will require you to provide an explanation. 

You can file an appeal through the following methods. 

  1. Appeal online through the HiRE website.
  2. Fax an appeal to (225) 342-4223.
  3. Email clerkappeal@lwc.la.gov to file.
  4. Mail to the Appeals Unit. (Louisiana Workforce Commission, Appeals Unit, P.O. Box 94094, Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9094.) 

The concerned authorities will review your appeal and notify you of a date and time of a hearing. Note that the hearing can take place over a telephone or face-to-face. Therefore, it is important that you provide the Commission with your phone number so that they can reach you at least one day before the hearing. 

If you have changed your phone number post filing an appeal, you can update it through HiRE website or by calling the Claim Center at 1-866-783-5567.

The state has multiple levels of appeal process. The first level of hearing will be scheduled before the Appeals Tribunal’s Administrative Law Judge. If you are unhappy with the Tribunal’s decision, you can file an appeal with the Board of Review. 

If you agree with the Board’s decision, you can appeal to the Judicial District Court.

Note 

  1. You need not pay any fee to appeal to the Board of Review or Appeals Tribunal.
  2. Continue to apply for benefits during the appeal process. If you win the appeal, you will receive benefits for the eligible weeks. 

How Long Will The Benefits Be Available?

Though the $300 weekly benefits is said to be available until December 27, 2020, it may end sooner if the funds allotted for the program exhausts. 

Closing Thoughts 

The Louisiana Workforce Commission has indicated that all the qualified applicants will receive the $300 additional weekly benefits, provided they have certified the unemployment was due to the pandemic. If you haven’t certified in your initial claims, quickly accredit, reapply for UI benefits and get additional payments.  

Florida is one of the states which received approval from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to participate in the Lost Wages Assistance (LWA) program. The approval means that the eligible people can receive benefits on top of their regular benefits. So who qualifies for an additional $300 unemployment benefits in Florida?

In this article, we will guide you through the eligibility criteria in the state and lots more. 

More About $300 Unemployment Benefits In Florida

Post expiration of $600 weekly benefits, President Donald Trump had signed a new executive order under which states can provide enhanced benefits to the qualified, provided they receive approval from FEMA.  

Recently, the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO) had applied for grants under the LWA program and received the approval. This means that Floridians eligible for Reemployment Assistance for weeks ending on or after August 1 can receive the additional $300 benefits.

After approving the state’s application, Pete Gaynor, FEMA Administrator, stated, “Unemployed Floridians are now eligible for the $300 per week in addition to their regular Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefit, provided the unemployment is the direct result of the Coronavirus pandemic.”

Who Qualifies For Additional Unemployment Benefits In Florida?

To qualify for extra $300 unemployment benefits in Florida, you must meet the following eligibility criteria.

  • You must be receiving a minimum $100 weekly benefit under the Reemployment Assistance program weekly benefit
  • You must have notified the Department that you are fully or partially unemployed due to the Coronavirus pandemic

You can also qualify for benefits if you receive at least $100 through any of the following programs. 

  • Extended Benefits (EB)
  • Short-Time Compensation (STC)
  • Trade Readjustment Allowance (TRA)
  • Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA)
  • Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) 
  • Unemployment Compensation for Ex-Service members (UCX)
  • Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC)
  • Benefits under the Self-Employment Assistance (SEA) program

How To Apply For $300 Weekly Benefits In The State?

If you are currently receiving benefits through any of the unemployment programs, you need not separately apply for additional benefits. The Department will automatically collect your information and pay you benefits. 

When Will You Receive The Additional Unemployment Benefits? 

The Department of Economic Opportunity is taking all possible steps to effectively implement the LWA program and pay out the extra benefits to the qualified Floridians as quickly as possible. 

LWA benefits will be issued either through a paper check or direct deposit. Note that benefits will be paid through a paper check if the debit card is chosen as a payment method. It is important to continue requesting your weekly benefit payments to help the Department process it to your account. 

To ensure you receive payments at the earliest, the Department recommends you to choose direct deposit as your preferred payment method. However, if you have selected a paper check as your payment method, make sure you verify your mailing address is correct, failing to which you may not receive the payments. 

What To Do If You Don’t Qualify For Additional Benefits?

Despite meeting eligibility requirements, if your additional $300 benefits are denied, you can file an unemployment appeal. You must file an appeal within 20 calendar days following the date of determination. If the 20th day falls on a legal holiday, Saturday, or Sunday, the appeal can be applied on the next business day. 

After filing an appeal, you will receive a notice of hearing that includes time, date, and contact information. Make sure you don’t miss the hearing, failing to which you may not receive benefits. However, if you cannot attend the scheduled hearing, inform the authorities in advance and request a postponement. 

During the hearing, the appeal referee will review the submitted documents, record statements, and give his or her decision. 

Note – Continue to apply for benefits during the appeals process. If you win the appeal, you will receive benefits for the applied weeks.  

Will You Qualify For Extra Benefits If You Have Recently Lost Your Job?

The state will pay benefits depending on your employment status on August 1. This indicates that you won’t qualify for first round of payments if you are recently unemployed. But if the state gets approval for additional weeks, you may receive payments in the future.

But first, you must apply for a Reemployment Assistance claim. Note that to qualify for the Florida unemployment benefits, you must meet certain criteria such as (but not limited to): 

  • Have lost your job through no fault of your own 
  • Have earned minimum wages in your base period 

Usually, the state requires you to meet work search requirements. However, due to the pandemic, this requirement has been suspended till December 2020.  

If you are self-employed or independent contractor or gig worker, you may not qualify for regular unemployment benefits but can apply for the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program. This program was created under the CARES Act and gives benefits up to 39 weeks. 

How To Apply For Florida Unemployment Benefits?

To apply for unemployment benefits in Florida, you must provide information such as:

1. Social Security number

2. Driving License, if any

3. State ID number

4. Details on your employment over the last 18 months, such as:

  • Employer names
  • Employer addresses and phone numbers
  • First and last working dates
  • Reason for job separation
  • Gross wages (before taxes) during employment periods
  • FEIN number (on your 1099 tax or W2 forms) or employer information from paystub

 Note 

1. If you are a non-U.S. citizen, you must provide your work authorization form or Alien Registration Number.

2. If you are a union member, you must provide the union’s name, phone number, and hall number.

3. If you are a military employee, you must provide your DD-214 Member Copy 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8.

4. If you are a federal employee, you must provide SF 50 or SF 8.

To file an initial unemployment claim, either visit www.floridajobs.org or submit an application through connect.myflorida

You can also apply through a paper application. The completed form should be mailed to the following address. Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, P.O. Box 5350. Tallahassee, FL 32314-5350. 

When Will The Benefits Last?

The Department has received guidance from the U.S. Department of Labor and FEMA, indicating that it would receive funds for approximately three weeks to pay the eligible claimants. However, the state may receive additional approvals on a week by week basis depending on the availability of funds.

Closing Thoughts

The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity is rigorously working on implementing the new executive order in the state. Though it would take some time, the Department guarantees that all the qualified will receive the benefits to meet their needs. To know more about the program, visit the state’s UI benefits. 

 

https://fileunemployment.org