FileUnemployment

The Total non-farm payroll employment in the United States rose by 250,000 in October and the unemployment rate remained unchanged at 3.7 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports. Job gains occurred in the health care industries, manufacturing, construction, and in transportation
and warehousing industries.

Household Survey Data

The unemployment rate in the United States remained at 3.7 percent in the month of October and the number of unemployed persons changed a little at 6.1 million. Over the year, the unemployment rate and the number of unemployed persons declined by 0.4 percentage point and 449,000, respectively.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for
adult men (3.5 percent),

adult women (3.4 percent),
teenagers (11.9 percent),
Whites (3.3 percent),
Blacks 
(6.2 percent),
Asians (3.2 percent), and Hispanics (4.4 percent) showed little or no

change in October.

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was essentially unchanged at 1.4 million in October and accounted for 22.5 percent of the unemployed.

The labor force participation rate increased by 0.2 percentage point to 62.9 percent in October but has shown little change over the year. The employment-population ratio edged up by 0.2 percentage point to 60.6 percent in October and has increased by 0.4 percentage point over the year.

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was essentially unchanged at 4.6 million in October. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part
time because their hours had been reduced or they were unable to find full-time jobs.

In October, 1.5 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, little changed from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job
sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.

Among the marginally attached, there were 506,000 discouraged workers in October, about unchanged from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available
for them. The remaining 984,000 persons marginally attached to the labor force in October had not searched for work for reasons such as school attendance or family
responsibilities.

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 250,000 in October, following an average monthly gain of 211,000 over the prior 12 months. In October, job growth occurred in health care, in manufacturing, in construction, and in transportation and warehousing.

Health care added 36,000 jobs in October. Within the industry, employment growth occurred in hospitals (+13,000) and in nursing and residential care facilities (+8,000). Employment in ambulatory health care services continued to trend up (+14,000). Over the past 12 months, health care employment grew by 323,000.

In October, employment in manufacturing increased by 32,000. Most of the increase occurred in durable goods manufacturing, with a gain in transportation equipment (+10,000). Manufacturing has added 296,000 jobs over the year, largely in durable
goods industries.

Construction employment rose by 30,000 in October, with nearly half of the gain occurring among residential specialty trade contractors (+14,000). Over the year, construction has added 330,000 jobs.

Employment in leisure and hospitality edged up in October (+42,000). Employment was unchanged in September, likely reflecting the impact of Hurricane Florence. The average gain for the 2 months combined (+21,000) was the same as the average monthly
gain in the industry for the 12-month period prior to September.

In October, employment in professional and business services continued to trend up
(+35,000). Over the year, the industry has added 516,000 jobs.

Employment in mining also continued to trend up over the month (+5,000). The industry has added 65,000 jobs over the year, with most of the gain in support activities for mining.

Employment in other major industries–including wholesale trade, retail trade, information, financial activities, and government-showed little change over the month.

The Unemployment rate in the United States remains unchanged at 3.9% while the total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 201,000 in the month of August. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics in their monthly report state that job gains occurred in professional and business services, wholesale trade, health care, transportation and warehousing and mining industries.

As stated above, the unemployment rate remained at 3.9% in August and the number of unemployed personnel remained at 6.2 million.

Household Survey Unemployment Data

In terms of the major worker groups, the unemployment rate for adult men was at 3.5%, and adult women tallied at 3.6% unemployed. Unemployed teenagers were accounted at 12.8%.

The Whites accounted at 3.4%, Blacks at 6.3%, Asians at 3% and Hispanics at 4.7%. There was little to no change in the unemployment rates for each major worker groups.

The number of long term unemployed people changed little in the month of August at 1.3 million and accounted for 21.5% of the total unemployed. Long term unemployed are people who have been jobless for 27 weeks or more. Over the year, the long term unemployed numbers have declined by 403,000.

In other findings from the report, the labor force participation rate (62.7%) and the employment population ratio (60.3%) both declined by 0.2% in the month of August 2018.

When it comes to people employed part time for economic reasons (also known as involuntary part time workers), at 4.4 million, changed little in the month of August. However, the number has been down by 830,000. It should be noted that these individuals preferred full-time employment but had to work part time because of reduced hours or the lack of full-time jobs.

The month of August 2018 sees 1.4 million people marginally attached to the labor force, which is a slight difference from the previous year. These people were not in the labor force, were looking to seek employment and have been searching for jobs sometime in the past 12 months.

Non Farm Payroll

In the month of August, the total non farm payroll employment had increased by 201,000. This is in tune with the average monthly gain of 196,000 over the past year. In the month of August, employment increased in the following industries:

  • Professional and Business Services
  • Health Care
  • Wholesale Trade
  • Transportation and Warehousing
  • Mining

The Professional and business services added in 53,000 jobs in the month of August. The professional and business services added in 519,000 over the past 12 months.

August 2018 sees an employment rise in the healthcare industry by 33,000. Most of the jobs gains stem mostly from ambulatory health care services with 21,000 jobs. Job gains of about 8,000 were seen in hospitals. Over the year, the healthcare industry has added in 301,000 jobs.

Employment in the wholesale trade industry increased by 22,000 in the month of August and 99,000 over the past 12 months. From the industry, the durable goods wholesalers added 14,000 jobs over the month. This accounted for about two-thirds of the over the year job gain in the wholesale trade industry.

The transportation and warehousing industry rose by 20,000 jobs in the month of August. The industry has risen by 173,000 jobs over the past year. Within the industry, couriers and messengers have been responsible for adding in around 4,000 jobs in the month of August.

The mining industry had a rise in employment by 6,000 jobs in the month of August and showed little change from its progress in July. Since a recent dip in October 2016, the mining industry has added in 104,000 jobs. Most of the jobs in entire support of mining activities.

The construction industry continues to have an uptick of 23,000 jobs in the month of August. Over the year, the construction industry has increased its jobs by 297,000 over the year.

The manufacturing industry changed slightly negatively in the month of August, with a loss of 3,000 jobs. Over the past 12 months, employment in the industry was up by 254,000. More than 3/4th of the gains were from the durable goods segment in the industry.

In terms of employment in other major industries, there was little to no change in employment. These major industries include retail trade, information, financial activities, leisure and hospitality and government.

United States President Donald Trump’s quest for job creation in the United States has had many twists and turns. President Trump believes that the solution to creating more jobs in the United States is through levying heavy trade tariffs, targeting mostly Chinese made products.

In 2018 alone, Trumps has levied tariffs on 10,000+ products from China, Canada and European Union. In reciprocation these countries have levied their own trade tariffs on American goods. While this may help certain industries to create more jobs within the country, there is always the scenario of cause and effect.

What President Trump has failed to realise, is that levying high tariffs on foreign goods does not affect traders but more importantly set the burden onto the American consumers. In order for American consumers to obtain foreign goods, they will have to pay the high tariffs of trade instead of the supplier.

Trade Tariffs Impacts Agrarian Economy

Trade Agrarian

The main industry that is affected by trump’s tariffs is the agriculture industry. This is because all the profits that farmers gain from trade become nullified because of the high tariffs, and this will result in severe losses.

While setting tariffs on agriculture would be a smart thing to do because the industry is solely export based. It leads the country to be vulnerable from trade tariffs being set by foreign countries. China is the second largest buyer of agricultural exports from agricultural exports. This means that farmers are particularly affected.

China retaliated by levying 25% duties on US agricultural products, which estimates to around $45 Billion. US producers of soybean, corn, poultry and beef were affected the most. As a result, farmers and agricultural workers have a hard time making a living in a sector that has always lagged behind historically in the national average of all industries.

Not to mention, poorer areas of the United States will be afflicted much more than others. States like Louisiana, Alabama and South Carolina have per capita incomes much lesser than the national average.

These households face the greatest threat in the export dependant agricultural companies, because of the inability to do business with one of their most important trade partners.

While it is significant that industries like the steel and aluminium stand to benefit from trade tariffs (possibility of gaining 26,000+ jobs), every industry is connected to each other. The high tariffs of steel and aluminum can affect the manufacturing of other products that use steel and aluminium. The dependency of a certain product and increase in trade tariffs can result in the loss of 400,000 jobs in other industries.  

Not only that, automobile companies like Ford or Mercedes Benz/ BMW will also be hit majorly with the trade tariffs being levied. While it may seem like a good idea to prevent the influx of foreign vehicles, these automobile companies have their largest factories situated right in the United States.

Higher tariffs on raw materials like Steel and Aluminium leads to higher production costs for the automobile industry. This in turn would lead to more reliance on machines and higher number of layoffs of human resource. This would lead countless number of jobs being lost and a rising unemployment rate.

Companies Affected by Trade Tariffs

Just this year, the largest nail maker in the US, Mid-Continent Nail had to let go of 60 workers after their sales plunged by 70% after Trump’s implementation of a 25% tariff on steel from Canada and Mexico. Similarly, the Poplar Bluff Company had to raise its prices which led to defection by customers. The company worries of  more layoffs and the termination of the entire 500 member workforce by Labor Day.

World renowned motorcycle company Harley-Davidson aims to shift a portion of its motorcycle manufacturing to outside the US in order to survive the trade war. The Milwaukee based motorcycle company stated in public filing that the move was paramount in preserving its second biggest sales market after the European marked imposed new tariffs. The company intends to close its plant in Kansas, Missouri, and add jobs to its Pennsylvania facility.

Meanwhile, Tariffs can lead to the cause of 4000 workers becoming unemployed at the Volvo plant in South Carolina. Volvo Cars Chief Executive Hakan Samuellsson told Reuters that trade barriers and restrictions were preventing them from creating as many jobs as they hoped to plan.

Finding Jobs

Trade Tariff Jobs

Now with the trade war deemed to escalate, it would mean the potential decrease in jobs. If you are currently looking for employment, it is advisable to check www.fileunemployment.org to see the unemployment benefits you could avail from the city/state you reside in. Also check out the various articles that provide vital information as to getting employed in the United States.

July 2018 saw the unemployment rate edge down to 3.9% from June’s 4.0%. The number of unemployed decreased by 284,000 to 6.3 million in the month of July. In both cases, numbers were down over the year by 0.4% and 676,000 numerically.

In terms of the major working groups, the unemployment rate for adult men and whites both declined to 3.4% in the month of July. The jobless rates for adult women remained at 3.7%. Teenagers at 13.1%, blacks at 6.6%, Asians at 3.1% and Hispanics at 4.5%.

When it comes to unemployed persons, the number of re-entrants to the labor force had a decrease of 287,000 in July to 1.8 million, following the increase in June. (Re-entrants are people who were previously employed but were not part of the labor force prior to beginning their job search)

Out of the total unemployed, the number of long term unemployed persons (those who have been unemployed for 27 weeks or more) remained unchanged from the 1.4 million in July. The long term unemployed accounted for 22.7% of the total unemployed.

The Labor participation rate for the month of July remained unchanged at 62.9% over the month of July as well as the year. The employment population ratio which is at 60.5% changed little in July but increased by 0.3% over the past 12 months.

The number of people who are employed part time for economical reasons (aka involuntary part time workers) changed little from 4.6 million in July, but over the year was down by 669,000. These people, would have preferred full time employment, had to settle for part time because of reduced hours and the inability to find full time jobs.

July 2018 sees 1.5 million people marginally attached to the labor force, which is a slight difference from the previous year. These people were not part of the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and were looking for jobs during the prior 12 months. The Bureau of Labor Statistics did not count them as unemployed because they did not look out for work for in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.

When it comes to the marginally attached, there were 512,00 workers who were discouraged, which is a slight change compared to the previous year. Discouraged workers are termed for people who aren’t currently look for work because of their belief that no jobs are available to them. The remainder 1 million people who are marginally attached to the labor force in July had not searched for employment due to family responsibilities and school attendance.

Non Farm Payroll Employment

The total non farm payroll employment increased by 157,000 in July 2018. This is in comparison to the average monthly gain of 203,000 in the past year. July saw job gains occur in professional and business services, manufacturing, health care and social assistance industries

Out of the non farm payroll employment increase, the professional and business services increased by 51,000 in the month, and 518,000 jobs over the year. Over the month, employment increased in the temporary health services by 28,000 and computer systems design and related services by 8000.

The manufacturing industry added in 37,000 in the month of july, with most gains in the durable goods component. There was an increase in employment in transportation equipment by 13000, 6000 in machinery and 2000 jobs in the electronic instruments industry. Over the past year, the manufacturing industry has added in 327,000 jobs.

Employment in health care and social assistance industries rose by 34,000 in the month of July. The healthcare industry trended up in employment over the month with 17000 jobs, contributing to an increase of 286,000 jobs over the year. Hospitals added in 7000 jobs over the month, whereas social assistance, individual and family services added in 16,000 jobs in July and 77,000 jobs over the year.

Employment in food services and drinking places continued to trend up over the month (+26,000). Over the year, the industry has added 203,000 jobs.

Construction employment continued to trend up in July (+19,000) and has increased by 308,000 over the year.

In July, employment in retail trade changed little (+7,000). Job gains occurred in general merchandise stores (+14,000), clothing and clothing accessories stores (+10,000), and food and beverage stores (+8,000). These employment gains were offset by a decline of 32,000 in sporting goods, hobby, book, and music stores, reflecting job losses in hobby, toy, and game stores.

Employment showed little or no change over the month in other major industries, including mining, wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, information, financial activities, and government.

The Employment Situation is a monthly report and survey conducted by the United States Bureau of Labour Statistics.

June 2018 sees the total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 213,000 and the unemployment rate rise 4.0% from the previous 3.9%. The U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics has stated that job growth mostly occurred in the professional and business services, manufacturing and healthcare industries while retail trade industries faltered and lost jobs.

Household Survey Data:

June saw the total unemployment rate rise by 0.2 percent to make the rate 4.0% overall. The number of unemployed persons also increased by 499,000 to 6.6 million overall. Looking back at the previous year, the unemployment rate was at 4.3% and the number of unemployed personnel was 7.0 million.

In the major worker groups, the unemployment rates among adult men were 3.7% and adult women standing at 3.7%. These two working groups and the Asian worker groups at 3.2% had an increase in the month of June. The unemployment rate for teenagers was at 12.6%, Whites at 3.5%, Blacks at 6.5% and Hispanics at 4.6% showing no change over the month.

When it comes to the unemployed, the number of job losses and people with temporary jobs increased by 211,000 in June resulting in an overall 3.1 million. The total number of re-entrants into the labor force rose by 204,000 leading to a total of 2.1 million. Re-entrants are those people who previously had worked but weren’t a part of the labor force prior to when they began their job search.

 In terms of the number of long-term unemployed persons (people who have been unemployed for 27 weeks or more) increased by 289,000 in June, totaling 1.5 million unemployed. These long-term unemployed people accounted for 23% of the total unemployed.

June saw the civilian labor force grow by 601,000. The labor force participation rate increased by 0.2% over the month to 62.9% overall but hasn’t depicted a clear trend so far this year.

The employment-population ratio, however, has been unchanged at 60.4% in June and has been essentially flat since February of 2018.

NonFarm Payroll Employment

The total nonfarm payroll employment for the month of June increased by 213,000 and has risen by 2.4 million over the past year. In June, job gains occurred in professional and business service industries, manufacturing industries and the healthcare industries. However, the month of June saw a decline in employment in the retail trade industry.

The professional and business services industries increased jobs by 50,000 in the month of June, all of which has contributed to the 521,000 jobs created in the past 12 months.

The manufacturing industries added in 36,000 jobs in the month of June. The durable goods manufacturing industry accounted for nearly all the increase in employment, with the inclusion of job gains in fabricated metal products (+ 7,000). Computer and electronic products had an increase in 5000 jobs, primary metals with 3000 jobs and motor vehicles and parts with 12000 jobs. The increase in jobs for the motor vehicles and parts industries comes after a large decrease of 8000 jobs in May 2018. Over the past 12 months, the manufacturing industry overall added 285,000 jobs.

The Healthcare industry in the United States increased its employment by 25,000 in the month of June. Over the year, the healthcare industry has added 309,000 jobs in the United States. In the healthcare industry, hospitals added in 11,000 jobs and employment in ambulatory health care services added in 14,000 jobs.

Employment in the construction industry has a constant uptick in employment with 13,000 jobs in the month of June. Over the year, the construction industry has garnered 282,000 jobs.

Employment in the mining industry continued in an upward trend with 5000 jobs added. The industry suffered a low point in October 2016 and since then added 95,000 jobs. The addition of jobs was mostly in support activities for mining.

The month of June saw the retail trade industry lose 22,000 jobs. The decline of jobs will majorly impact the gain of 25,000 jobs that were made in May 2018.

In terms of major industries, there was little or no change in the month of June. The industries that saw minimal change in employment are the wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, information industries, financial activities, leisure and hospitality industries and government-run industries.

 

The total nonfarm payroll employment in the United States increased by 223,000 in May 2018. Coincidentally, the unemployment rate in the United States edged down further to 3.8%, as reported by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. There has been a steady uptick in employment in several industries. These industries include retail trade, health care, and construction.

Over the years, the unemployment rate in the country edged down by 0.5% which resulted in the number of unemployed persons declining by 772,000. The total number of unemployed persons has declined to 6.1 million.

The Employment Situation in the US May 2018

Among the major working groups, the unemployment rate for adult men was 3.5%. African-Americans were reported to be at 5.9% and Asians to be at 2.1% The jobless rates for adult women were reported to be at 3.3%, teenagers at 12.8%. Whites and Hispanics were reported to be at 3.5% and 4.9% respectively.

When it comes to the number of long-term unemployed ( people jobless for 27 weeks or more), there was little to no change at 1.2 million in May. the long-term unemployed accounted for 19.4% of the total unemployed. Over the past year, the number of long-term unemployed declined by 476,000.

The labor force participation rate for the month of may changed little at 62.7% while the employment-population ratio remained at 60.4%.

Nonfarm Payroll Employment

May 2018 saw the total nonfarm payroll increase by 223,000. This is in comparison of the average monthly gain of 191,000 over the past 12 months. Over the month of may, employment trended up in many industries, namely retail trade, health care and construction.

May saw the retail trade industry add 31,000 jobs, with gains mostly occurring in general merchandise stores (+13,000) and building material and garden supply stores (+6000). Over the year, the retail trade industry added 125,000 jobs.

The healthcare industry saw its employment increase by 29,000 in May. This is similar to the average monthly gain in employment in the past 12 months. Employment in ambulatory health services was increased by 18,000 jobs in May while employment in hospitals trended up by 6000.

The Construction industry continues its upward trend in Employment with the addition of +25000 jobs in the month of May. Over the past 12 months, the construction industry has raised 286,000 jobs. Within the construction industry, nonresidential specialty trade contractors added 15,000 jobs over the month.

Professional and technical services saw its employment trend up by +23000 jobs in May and have risen in jobs by 206,000 over the year.

The transportation and warehousing industry added 19,000 jobs in the month of May and 156,000 jobs in the past 12 months. Job gains of +7000 occurred in warehousing and storage, and +5000 jobs were gained in couriers and messengers.

Employment in the manufacturing industries expanded by +18000 over the month of may. Durable goods accounted for most of the increase in jobs, with the inclusion of 6000 jobs in machinery. Employment in manufacturing industries rose by 259,000 over the year with about 3/4th of jobs coming from the durable goods industries.

The mining industry added in 6000 jobs in the month of may. Since the low point occurring in October 2016, the mining industry has grown by 91,000 jobs. This is mostly because of support activities for mining which accounts for nearly all of the increase in jobs.

In terms of other major industries like wholesale trade, information, financial activities, leisure and hospitality and government saw little to no change in the month of May 2018.

FUN-14_Jobless_States_US_Economic_ExpansionApril 2018 marks the 107th month of the current economic expansion that had begun in June of 2009. This expansion surpassed what was previously regarded as the second longest economic expansion in US history from February 1961 to December 1969. With the assumption that this economic performance continues, the record low jobless rates in 14 states will become part of the second longest economic expansion in US history.

Fourteen states have set new records for low unemployment rates in the previous year, which is nearly a decade after the recession that left a large populous of Americans unemployed. States that hit the new unemployment low are Hawaii (2.1%), Idaho (2.9%), Kentucky (4%), Maine (2.7%), Mississippi (4.5%). Oregon (4.1%) and Wisconsin (2.9%)

The State of California as well set a new record last month. The unemployment rate of the Golden State stands at 4.1% according to the unemployment situation a bi-monthly report published by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. That’s the lowest rate recorded since BLS began keeping track of state-level unemployment figures in 1976. It’s a third of the 12.3% unemployment rate California notched at the height of the recession in December 2010. Among the other states to reach an all-time low is Colorado at 2.6%, Alabama at 3.7%, Texas at 3.9%. All these states have attained an all-time low in comparison to the 8.3% they averaged during the recession period of December 2010.

In terms of the remainder of the 14 states with the low unemployment rate, Tennessee has fallen to the lowest unemployment rate it has ever measured, 3.3 percent, in January. Hawaii’s unemployment rate is the lowest in the nation. Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota and Wisconsin all have unemployment rates lower than 3%.

It seems likely that the current economic and job growth continues well into next year. It also depends on a major trade war or other major economic/political risks that would derail the expansion. May of  2019 will be the 121st month of the current expansion and will break the previous record 120-month expansion from March 1991 to March 2001. In the meantime, the two important economic milestones outlined above of record jobless rates in more than one out of four US states. Along with surpassing the previous 106-month record for the second longest uninterrupted period of economic expansion in US history. The decline in unemployment rates is a reason for the public of the United States should rejoice!

FUN_Unemployment_April18

The month of April sees the total nonfarm payroll employment in the United States increased by 164,000. But the biggest update in the month of April is the unemployment rate edging down to 3.9 percent. This update comes after six months of being static at 4.1%. In terms of employment, jobs gains had occurred in the professional and business services, manufacturing, healthcare, and mining industries.

In April, the unemployment rate marked down to 3.9%, following 6 months of being constantly marked at 4.1%. The number of people unemployed in the united states, locked at 6.3 million also edged down over the month.

Based on household survey data provided by the Bureau of Labour Statistics, the unemployment rate for adult women decreased to 3.5% in April. In terms of the jobless rates of other demographics adult men remained at 3.7%  and teenagers at 12.9%. Whites remained at 3.6%, Blacks at 6.6%, Asians at 2.8% and Hispanics at 4.8%. Most of the demographics showed little to no change over the month of April.

FUN_ Unemployment rate Apr 18

Among the unemployed people, the number of job losers and people who completed temporary jobs has declined by 188,000 in the month of April to the total of 3 million. In terms of the long-term unemployed ( people who have been unemployed for 27 weeks or more). There was little change at 1.3 million. In the month of April, the long-term unemployed accounted for 20% of the total unemployed. Over the year, the number of long-term unemployed was down by 340,000.

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred
to as involuntary part-time workers) was essentially unchanged at 5.0 million in
April. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were
working part time because their hours had been reduced or because they were unable
to find full-time jobs.

Establishment Unemployment Survey Data

Unemployment Non Farm Apr 18


As explained above the Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 164,000 in April, compared to an average monthly gain of 191,000 over the past one year. In April, job gains
occurred in professional and business services, manufacturing, healthcare, and
mining.

In April, employment in professional and business services increased by 54,000. Over
the past 12 months, the industry has added 518,000 jobs.

Employment in manufacturing increased by 24,000 in April. Most of the gain was in
the durable goods industry, with machinery adding 8,000 jobs and employment in
fabricated metal products continuing to trend up (+4,000). Employment in Manufacturing
has risen by 245,000 over the year, with about three-fourths of the growth in durable
goods industries.

The Healthcare industry added 24,000 jobs in April and 305,000 jobs over the year. In April,
employment rose in ambulatory health care services (+17,000) and hospitals (+8,000).

In April, employment in mining increased by 8,000, with most of the gain occurring
in support activities for mining (+7,000). Since a recent low in October 2016,
employment in mining has risen by 86,000.

Employment changed little over the month in other major industries, including
construction, wholesale trade, retail trade, transportation, and warehousing,
information, financial activities, leisure and hospitality, and government.

Unemployment Situation US March 18

The unemployment rate in the United States for the month of March 2018, remains unchanged at 4.1%. There has been no change in the unemployment rate since October 2017. However, in the month of March, the total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 103,000. There has been a significant increase in employment in industries such as construction, retail trade, professional and business services, manufacturing, financial activities, and mining.

March is the sixth consecutive month with the unemployment rate has remained at 4.1%, with the number of unemployed persons staying relatively unchanged at 6.7 million.

In terms of the major work groups, the unemployment rate for the blacks declined to 6.9% in March. Out of the unemployed demographic Adult men (3.7 percent), Adult Women (3.7 percent), Teenagers (13.5 percent) Showed no change from previous months. The same can be said for The Whites (3.6 percent), Asians (3.1 percent), and Hispanics (5.1 percent).

The number of long-term unemployed persons (People who haven’t been employed for more than 27 weeks) also remained relatively unchanged at 1.4 million. The long-term unemployed consisted of 20.3 % of the total number of unemployed people.

Employment increase in different industries

The total number of nonfarm employment had increased by 103,000 in March with an overall of 326,000 jobs. There was a significant rise in jobs in the manufacturing, health and mining industries.

In March, the Manufacturing industry increased by 22,000 jobs. Most of the gain in jobs in the manufacturing industry all stemmed from the durable goods component. Specifically, jobs grew in the manufacturing of fabricated metal products over the month (+9,000). Over the year, manufacturing has added 232,000 jobs. Out of the manufacturing industry the durable
goods component accounted for about three-fourths of the jobs added.

March also saw a rise in jobs in the healthcare industry. The month saw 22,000 jobs added in the industry. Employment trended up mostly in the ambulatory health care services (+16,000) and hospitals (+10,000).

The Mining industry saw an increase of 9000 jobs, with gains occurring in support activities for mining (+6000) and in oil and gas extraction (+2000). Employment in the mining industry has risen by 78,000 since October 2016.

In terms of Professional and Business industries, March saw an uptick in jobs by 33,000 and has risen by 502,000 jobs over the year.

March saw little change in Retail trade employment with -4000, following the increase to 47,000 jobs in February. March observed a decline in employment by 13,000 in general merchandise stores. This decline, in turn, offsets the gain of a similar number of jobs created in February. With all the shift in jobs, over the year the retail trade industry depicts little net change.

The Construction industry also saw a decline in jobs (-15,000) following up from the large gain of 65,000 jobs in February.

There was little change in employment over the month in other major industries, which include wholesale trade, transportation, and warehousing, information, financial activities, leisure and hospitality as well as government.

The Employment Situation is a monthly report that is issued by the United States Bureau of Labour Statistics. Every month research and surveys are conducted in all demographics of the United States on the employment statistics and unemployment rates. If you would like a comparison of the employment statistics for this month and the previous month you can always find the Employment Situation report for the month of February at www.fileunemployment.org

The unemployment rate in the United States for the month of February 2018, remains unchanged at 4.1%. There has been no change in the unemployment rate since October 2017. However, in the month of February, the total nonfarm payroll employment increased to 313,000. There has been a significant increase in employment in industries such as construction, retail trade, professional and business services, manufacturing, financial activities, and mining.

February is the fifth consecutive month with the unemployment rate has remained at 4.1%, with the number of unemployed persons staying relatively unchanged at 6.7 million.

The Employment Situation in the United States in February 2018

In terms of the major work groups, the unemployment rate for the blacks declined to 6.9% in February. Out of the unemployed demographic Adult men (3.7 percent), Adult Women (3.8 percent), Teenagers (14.4 percent) Showed no change from previous months. The same can be said for The Whites (3.7 percent), Asians (2.9 percent), and Hispanics (4.9 percent).

The number of long-term unemployed persons (People who haven’t been employed for more than 27 weeks) also remained relatively unchanged at 1.4 million. The long-term unemployed consisted as 20% of the total number of unemployed people.

Employment Increase in Different Industries

Unemployment Rate Seasonally Adjusted February 2016 February 2018

The total number of nonfarm employment had increased to 313,000 in February. There was a significant rise in jobs in the following industries.construction, retail trade, professional and business services, manufacturing, financial activities, and mining.

In February, employment in the construction industry increased by 61,000, with gains in specialty trade contractors (+38,000) and the construction of buildings (+16,000). Construction has added 185,000 jobs over the past 4 months.

The Retail trade industry increased its employment by 50,000 over the month. Within the industry, employment rose in general merchandise stores (+18,000) and in clothing and clothing accessories stores (+15,000). However, over the past 4 months, which traditionally sees the bulk of holiday hiring and layoffs, employment in these industries has changed little on paper. On the other end of the spectrum of the retail trade industry, building material and garden supply stores added jobs over the month (+10,000).

Employment in professional and business services increased by 50,000 in February and has risen by 495,000 over the year. Employment in temporary help services edged up over the month (+27,000).

The Manufacturing industry added 31,000 jobs in February. Within the industry, employment rose in transportation equipment (+8,000), fabricated metal products (+6,000), machinery (+6,000), and primary metals (+4,000).

Over the past year, manufacturing has added 224,000 jobs. Financial activities added 28,000 jobs over the month, with gains in credit intermediation and related activities (+8,000); insurance carriers and related activities (+8,000); and securities, commodity contracts, and investments (+5,000). Over the year, financial activities have added 143,000 jobs.

Employment in mining rose by 9,000 in February, with most of the increase in support activities for mining (+7,000). Since a recent low in October 2016, mining has added 69,000 jobs.

Employment in health care continued to trend up in February (+19,000), with a gain of 9,000 in hospitals. Healthcare has added 290,000 jobs over the past year.

Employment in other major industries, including wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, information, leisure and hospitality, and government, showed little change over the month.

Increase in Average Workweek and Pay

Non Farm Payroll Employment Over The Month Change Seasonally Adjusted February 2016 in February 2018

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 0.1 hour to 34.5 hours in February. In manufacturing, the workweek increased by 0.2 hour to 41.0 hours, while overtime edged up by 0.1 hour to 3.6 hours. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 0.2 hour to 33.8 hours.

In February, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 4 cents to $26.75, following a 7-cent gain in January. Over the year, average hourly earnings have increased by 68 cents or 2.6 percent. Average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 6 cents to $22.40 in February.

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for December was revised up from +160,000 to
+175,000, and the change for January was revised up from +200,000 to +239,000. With these revisions, employment gains in December and January combined were 54,000 more than previously reported. (Monthly revisions result from additional reports received from businesses and government agencies since the last published estimates and from the recalculation of seasonal factors.) After revisions, job gains have averaged 242,000 over the last 3 months.

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